Full-Circle, Twice Around: my Big #HitRefresh

by Joe

OK, you’ve seen each of the kids post their “one-year back” blog entries… and this is mine.  Except I’m trying something a little different this time,  I wrote mine from a “PROFESSIONAL” perspective and put it on LinkedIn.   After all, you know all about the TRIP but what you don’t know is how the trip affected a year of life AT WORK.

SO here it is… for all you professionals:

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/full-circle-twice-around-my-big-refresh-joe-belfiore/

Happy Holidays! Music Video .. looking back on the Big Trip

 

We wish all of you a very happy holiday season!

Last year we made our traditional “family holiday music video” right after Christmas as a retrospective on the trip..  so this year we’re going to post that video on the blog.  Enjoy!

(Maybe some year we’ll manage to make the holiday video BEFORE Christmas… or.. umm.. maybe we won’t.  😊)

Aaah..we’re so glad to be home! 

 

 

For our complete collection of holiday (and other) videos … check us out on Vimeo.

Stats: Our Big Trip by the Numbers

We Belfiores are math-people.  (Hey — no giggling out there!  This is true!)

Want proof? Try asking one of us whether we were worried about traveling around the world in the face of ISIS and other unfortunate conflict around the world, which makes travel SEEM like it might be unsafe… and we’ll respond with an explanation rooted in the statistics of misfortune that might befall travelers around the world.  (hint:  motor vehicle trauma is FAR SCARIER than terrorism.)

Want more proof?  We can tell you how far we walked.  And how far we drove.  Guess which was farther… number of ship-miles or number of plane-miles?  Guess another — which was farther.. our total mileage, or the distance from the earth to the moon!?

SO, now that you’re interest is piqued… here’s the NUMERICAL view of our Big Trip!

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Homeschooling … plan and approach

Our Homeschooling plan had to account for:

  • a 6th grader
  • 2nd graders

Our philosophy was to emphasize reading, writing and math for all our kids .. and to turn an informed-travel experience into education around history and culture.

We didn’t try to duplicate a “typical year of school” by covering all the school subjects.  Instead, we focused on a subset of areas which would be relevant to the places we’d visit and most important in keeping them at-pace to return to 7th and 3rd grades.  

Tools & Resources

We didn’t use any specific homeschool curriculum or packaged tools .. but we got HUGE value out of Khan Academy .. and specifically the capability to take Khan Academy offline, since so much of our time was at sea with no internet. (Sidebar: this only MOSTLY worked .. but not 100% of the time.. and was a little clunky. It’s now offered as part of a service called Kolibri).

Keep in mind that Khan Academy not only does instruction but has practice questions. The two best uses for us were (a) “Crash Course” in World History — AMAZING … and (b) Khan Academy algebra 1, which Alexander completed.

Beyond that, we built a reading-list (below) based on what their school covered, as well as “great books”, we created writing assignments — specifically blog posts and some essays, eventually we had the kids make preport presentations” in Powerpoint … and our 2nd graders did math workbooks.

Our “coursework” – more detail

We focused on:

  1. “Social studies” – History & Culture.  The top thing we spent time on with all three of our kids was a blend of history and culture as we travelled.  We visited many, many museums .. cathedrals.. historic sites … and in every situation we spent a lot of time preparing them by talking about the history or culture behind the areas.  Our kids now know/understand US history, many aspects of European history (Renaissance, French Revolution, World Wars, etc.), plus getting exposure to Asian cultures, African culture/history (Slave castles in Ghana, Townships in South Africa) and world religions.  

    After we left Semester at Sea, we adopted the practice of having our kids create “Preport” presentations, taking turns creating a Powerpoint slide deck explaining culture, history, relevant sites for each place we visited.
  2. Writing.  All our kids wrote blog posts about the trip and a number of essays, and Alexander also wrote his 7th-grade re-admissions essays for SCDS.   We probably spent more time on writing than any other single type of “school work”, and I’m confident that the amount of write/revise that Alexander spent on blog-writing was at least as high as on any typical in-school project… and probably a lot more because we cared about ‘public quality’!
  3. Reading/Literature.  We got a book-list from Alexander’s school and also added titles to it from our own experience and relevant to where we would visit.  Occasionally we’d co-read the book and then have a discussion to talk through themes, meaning, etc.
  4. Math.  We did self-study math with each of our kids,  Alexander took Algebra 1 using Khan Academy.
  5. Music.  Alexander taught-himself the ukulele and kept-up his piano for the 4+ months we were aboard the ship.

We did NOT spend any “formal” time teaching/studying:  science, foreign language, grammar/vocabulary, technology, etc.   (though Alexander used DuoLingo to keep up his Spanish, which he practiced in person a bit on the trip.)   Here’s some additional detail on each of the subjects above.

History & Culture: Scripted to match our travel

Their “history and culture” lesson unfolded in a kind of roughly “reverse chronological” experience:

  1. US History:  We began our trip in Atlanta and spent a lot of time discussing the Civil Rights movement (e.g. visiting the Civil Rights museum in Atlanta, watching “Selma”, “The Rosa Parks Story”, visiting the 16th Street Baptist Church and affiliated civil rights museum in Birmingham.) As we travelled up the coast, we went “back in time” covering US wars in particular (Vietnam, WW2, Civil War, Revolutionary War) as well as key US figures (Roosevelt, Lincoln, Washington, Jefferson) as we spent time in Washington DC visiting the relevant museums (Museum of American History) and monuments (Mt Vernon, etc.).
  2. Semester at Sea (Asia/Africa/Europe): new cultures, geography, world religions.   While aboard the ship, Alexander became quite expert at world geography and got a solid introduction to world religions.  A significant part of the world-learning was attending the SAS program’s “pre-port” sessions, which were held the two evenings before each port stop.  The first night was a “cultural” pre-port, focused on language, religion, customs, history.  The second night was “logistical” pre-port, with more practical information on currency, getting around, food.
  3. Slavery and other Human Rights issues.  This was probably the most significant topic of our “social studies” discussions.
    • In South Africa & Ghana, which included two visits to a township, Robben Island where Nelson Mandela was held, as well as two slave castles in Ghana where we got a firsthand look at the horrific conditions to which the enslaved were subjected.
    • In China, Alexander tackled a modern human rights question by putting together a Powerpoint slide deck he presented to students on the ship describing our visit to the Pegatron/Microsoft factory where young Chinese are employed at low-wages building PCs and other devices.
    • In Germany, we visited Sachsenhausen, a concentration camp. We had many discussions about the racism, antisemitism,  and hatred fostered by the Nazis.  We visited many other museums and sites that describe the Nazi rise as well as the rise of communism in East Germany.
  1. World religions.  Our kids got exposed to a wide-range of world religions both via talks on the ship, videos, and first-hand experiences.  We visited Shinto shrines in Japan, many Buddhist temples (Myanmar, Vietnam), the Taj Mahal,  Al Alhambra and other Muslim buildings/mosques in Africa and Europe.   We discussed Christianity in some detail and covered some Judaism to mesh with seeing historic cathedrals, churches and a few synagogues. (and “Crash Course” again came in super helpful to explain the history in a fun way!)
  1. World events: French revolution, British colonialism, World Wars, Communism/Nazi-ism etc.  In Europe we spent time on these topics via books & movies (“Tale of Two Cities”, “Marie Antoinette”, “Ghandi” ), many sites (Churchill War Rooms, Musee des Arts et Metiers and Paris War Museum, Versailles, Topography of Terror in Berlin, etc.) as well as some tours (WW2 tour in Prague).  We also visited the “American War Museum” in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam to get another view of the US military operations in that country.


Alexander: 7th Grade Literature/Reading list

Below is a list of books he read during the trip:

  • Romeo & Juliet
  • To Be a Slave
  • Red Badge of Courage
  • Black Boy
  • To Kill a Mockingbird
  • The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind
  • A Long Walk to Water
  • Lord of the Flies
  • Sherlock Holmes
  • 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea
  • Tom Sawyer
  • Treasure Island
  • Boy in the Striped Pajamas
  • Tale of Two Cities (movie)

Iceland 2: The End.

 

At 4pm on Tuesday we were sitting around “Joe and the Juice” in the Reykjavik airport, looking up at the Flight Departures monitor. Bags checked, we had an hour to kill before our flight.

Wistfully, I said to the kids “Hey — take a look at that board.  If I said you could pick one of THOSE flights instead of our Seattle flight.. and keep going for a month… which would you pick?”

Four of us chose an intriguing city we hadn’t yet visited and went with the hypothetical… Alexander liked the Canadian east coast. The other choices were in Europe– ready to skip out on our return home.

But Piper stood alone in her conviction. Even though we’d had an amazing time finishing up Iceland with a helicopter tour and silica masks in the Blue Lagoon … she knew that all good things must come to an end and great things were waiting for us back at home.

How lucky we’ve been … how lucky we are…  is not lost on us.

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Iceland Part 1: Volcanoes, Geysers, Waterfalls

We landed in Iceland at 10pm on a Thursday … and with the sun high in the sky, walked to the airport hotel to crash.  Considering the 2-hour time change from Denmark, we were officially beginning our journey (and adjustment) towards home.

The next few days showed us yet-another brand new world… waterfalls, rainbows, volcanoes, bubbling ground, exploding geysers, natural pools to swim in, new foods to eat.

But our very first activity was to descend 200m into the crater of a volcano– that’s the height of TWO Statue of Liberty’s– riding on the aluminum frame and ropes of a mere window-washing scaffold… Continue reading