As a day-trip from Kanazawa, we boarded a bus and drove 1.5 hours up into the mountains to Shirakawa-Go. At the heart of the area, the village of Ogimachi was built hundreds of years ago in (literally) one of the world’s snowiest climates. It’s famous for the gasshō (合掌) style of houses whose architecture and construction have endured against-all-odds– as they are built entirely of wood with thick grass roofing.

Amazing gosho style thatched roofs in Shirakawa-Go

Amazing gosho style thatched roofs in Shirakawa-Go

Amazing gosho style thatched roofs in Shirakawa-Go

 

Our kids again had a blast just frolicking in the snow, and we enjoyed the spectacular scenery– particularly including a dicey suspension bridge hanging high above a raging river.

Gorgeous Shirakawa-Go, in the Japanese mountains

 

In spite of the fact that on this day of all days, Sydney and Piper left their gloves in the hotel room (!), everyone had a marvelous time even with wet feet (leather tennis shoes… sigh) and partially-frozen hands.

We hiked around, visited the local shops, satisfied Sydney’s never-ending desire for udon, and took a lot of pictures.  🙂

 

Gorgeous Shirakawa-Go, in the Japanese mountains

Gorgeous Shirakawa-Go, in the Japanese mountains

4 thoughts on “Japan Alps: Shirakawa-Go

  1. Amazing photography! I was interested in the “gosho style,” which apparently is referred to in the Kyoto Emperior’s Palace – “Ko-gosho (小御所, Court Room.

    Nevertheless, the thatched roofs are reminiscent of those seen in the English Cotswolds e.g. Minster Lovell near Oxford. Your most interesting travelogue has allowed us to reminisce. Aloha, Tom & Suzanne

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  2. Those pictures are really amazing. They make me really wish that it was snowing here in Washington. What’s, “Udon.” Sydney and Piper leaving there gloves at the hotel looks like a Jacob-thing to do. Send by best regards to the kids. We miss them here so much.

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